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Gallery

18
  • January 12 - Gallery
    The films of Grant Rohloff capture a golden era of surfing, the ‘50s and ‘60s, when fun and mischief and big balls were all-important. Men Who Ride Mountains unveils the nascent big-wave scene on the North Shore. Wet and Wild depicts the sport of kings in all its sun-struck, cross-stepping glory. When Rohloff passed away from lymphoma cancer in 1989, he passed his body of work along to his son, Chris, a keen surfer and a massive appreciator of his father’s life and art. There was a lot…
    By Jamie Brisick
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  • September 27 - Gallery
    The first title from T. Adler Books to whack me over the head was “Dora Lives: The Authorized Story of Miki Dora.” Wrapped in signature translucent dust jacket, the cover shows a tightly-cropped shot of the legendary surfer cross-stepping on the board. The book brims with emotion and barefoot hedonism. Photos are often imperfect in the best possible way—skewed compositions, soft focus, light leaks, a touch over- or under-exposed. The stories, captions, and timeline are whimsical and fun.…
    By Jamie Brisick
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  • August 15 - Gallery
    Dave Homcy’s family portrait series was inspired by those Wild West old-time photos that look like a scene out of Deadwood. “I ran across one of those of my family a while back and thought, That’s so funny, the family portrait! I’ve always thought family is so important. Everybody has a family. Good or bad, family is a big part of who we are.” Homcy began the series about a decade ago. Many of the families in the photos are close friends, people he stays with while working as a D.P. and…
    By Jamie Brisick
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  • July 26 - Gallery
    Well we're almost through the end of July of 2016 and our friend and director / photographer Saam Gabbay has been keeping busy. You'll remember his work from our 'Nomadic Life' series that featured him a few months back. If you haven't read it, find it here. Saam's been on the road non-stop since. hitting 4 continents in this short amount of time. Here's a breakdown of Saam's travels thus far in his own words... I don’t make new years resolutions but I do write a sentence in my…
    By Zak Bush
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  • June 20 - Gallery
    "My friends were getting some of the best rides of their lives competing in honor of Eddie and I was grounded on a tarmac in downtown Honolulu." - Mike Coots The anticipation of the event had been building for 7 years. The last time the Eddie ran back in 2009, I'd photographed it from the sky the. That day had been the most thrilling, unique and challenging photo shoot I'd ever done. The following winter I'd hoped for another chance to shoot the event from above but it…
    By Mike Coots
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  • May 17 - Gallery
    Photographer Jeff Divine has been a key figure in the surf world for nearly five decades. His portraits, landscapes, and action shots have helped shape the culture, and given us a richer understanding of what surfing means. I asked him about his excellent work in the ‘70s, and how it was different to today: “I wasn’t following other photographers, because there weren’t many around,” he told me. “I had to figure it out on my own. I’d sit in my car at Sunset Beach…
    By Jamie Brisick
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  • March 31 - Gallery
    The late ‘60s/early ‘70s saw a heap of change in the world—and a heap of change in surfing. Boards dropped from ten-foot logs to seven-foot pocket rockets. Wave riders zapped up and down the face, going wherever their imaginations would take them. Hawaii became an epicenter of experimentation—in lifestyle, in boards, in surfing wholesale. Surfer/photographer Rusty Miller was right in the thick of it. His book, Turning Point II Surf Portraits and Stories Hawaii: Oahu – Kauai – Maui…
    By Jamie Brisick
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  • March 15 - Gallery
    Several years ago I attended a weeklong photography course at Santa Fe Workshops, one of the most high-level photo schools in the country. At the time I was shooting voraciously, mostly portraiture and travel. I was enrolled in “Lighting on Location”—I was clueless when it came to using strobes. The instructor had a studio in Los Angeles; he shot a lot of celebrity and corporate portraiture. Concurrent with our workshop were two others, one of which was a travel photography workshop,…
    By Jamie Brisick
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  • February 23 - Gallery
    Born and raised in Portland, Oregon and based in NYC, Adrian Gaut first studied to be a painter, then found his way to photography. He shoots everything, but his first love—and perhaps his specialty—is architecture. I met up with him on a recent trip to LA. We sipped green tea at a friend’s Malibu home while he took me through some of his favorite architecture images, most of which were shot abroad. “There’s a sense of discovery that comes with travel,” he told me. “The idea that you…
    By Jamie Brisick
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  • February 9 - Gallery
    Australian surfing in the early ‘70s was golden—living was cheap and easy, good waves were abundant and uncrowded, board design was enjoying a period of great experimentation and innovation. Why not escape the hurried masses, move into a camper van along some rifling point break, and surf your life (or at least your twenties) away? Turning Point: Surf Portraits and Stories from Bells to Byron 1970-1971, by surfer/photographer Rusty Miller, captures this era in all its halcyon glory. The…
    By Jamie Brisick
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  • November 30 - Gallery
    Brazilian photographer Vava Ribeiro shoots from his imagination, often exploring that liminal space between reality and dream. His most recent work-in-progress involves concrete, smooth and curvaceous concrete, the kind that elicits inner whoops in seasoned skateboarders. He began in February of this year, and has thus far shot parks in California, New York, and Brazil. “It’s a departure for me,” he said. “It is taking me toward a more tactile place. I feel like it may be pulling me…
    By Jamie Brisick
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  • November 7 - Gallery
    By choosing to not use any new material in his work, Mark brings to the forefront the idea of how we consume by creatively reusing and reclaiming items that in another light would just be seen as trash. If you're unfamiliar with the artwork of legendary waterman Mark Cunningham, you're at a loss. His ability to take abandoned man-made objects out of the ocean and turn them into art pieces with such authenticity is something only a true waterman could do.
    By Zak Bush
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  • September 22 - Gallery
    "The ocean calls everyone's name. The beauty of breaking waves is amazing. Every single wave is different." New York based photographer, Matt Clark, was awarded the 2nd annual Follow the Light Foundation grant presented by Surfing Magazine in 2007. He's currently represented by galleries both in the U.S. and Internationally. Matt's work can be found anywhere from the cover of a magazine to the NYC transit system, from the streets of Paris to Time Square...
    By Zak Bush
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  • September 8 - Gallery
    "There’s already hundreds of people in the water making the line-up rival Ditch Plains in August or Malibu on a south swell." After a long day and late night in Tokyo we corral ourselves into taxis to hit the road to Kamakura. Exhaustion takes over and I quickly find myself asleep for the hour long ride. Suburban Tokyo passed by unseen as we sleep. We arrive just after midnight and drag ourselves to our rooms with no energy to acknowledge where we are. I’m wrestled awake at...
    By Zak Bush
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  • September 8 - Gallery
    "It’s the dichotomy of familiar and foreign; the packed trains, the mysterious food, the back street boutique shops, the futuristic technology, and the ancient shrines." Flying into Tokyo for a few days and all I can do is wonder, what do I do? There’s so much to see and so little time. I’ve waited years for a chance to see the city that many call the greatest in the world. It’s the dichotomy of familiar and foreign; the packed trains, the mysterious food, the back st...
    By Zak Bush
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  • August 27 - Gallery
    Experiencing a new culture is, more often than not, defined by the people you meet along the way. The hospitality we encountered during our short journey to Japan was unbelievable. Below are a few of the people who made our trip so special, from photographers who shot Kelly, to friends who showed us the gems of Tokyo and Kamakura, to random people we built relationships with on the street. Thanks for all your hospitality, Japan, we'll be back soon. Keep your eye’s peeled for more...
    By Zak Bush
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  • July 21 - Gallery
    Looking out the window when you arrive in a new exotic place never gets old. We chartered this small puddle jumper last minute to be able to time the swell properly. We only had a small window of opportunity if we wanted to find waves. "If I told you where we were, I don’t think I’d be invited back, so let’s just say it’s somewhere that's not easy to get to," - Todd Glaser. For the past several years I have been fortunate enough to become friends and chase waves with a guy who needs no…
    By Todd Glaser
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  • July 7 - Gallery
    Zvereff's series “Introspective” began with the idea to photograph six different countries' arctic and sub-arctic regions using some of the last remaining Kodak Aerochrome infrared film in existence. Aerochrome is 120mm false-color reversal film and was originally developed during the Vietnam War for camouflage detection and vegetation and forestry surveys. Because of its unnatural color profile Aerochrome creates surreal looking images though development and processing, by...
    By Zak Bush
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